When Are Blueberries In Season: Harvest Months By State


When Are Blueberries In Season
When Are Blueberries In Season

Blueberries are being grown in more and more different States across the United States. They are a hardy bush and can tolerate a good range of temperatures and climates due to the many different cultivars now available. I thought it would be good to list the picking and growing seasons State by State. So here goes:

Summer months are the harvest season for blueberries, which grow very well throughout the United States. Harvest time for blueberries, is from March to September depending on what State you are in. Florida has the earliest harvest beginning late March and Maine and Idaho the latest harvest ending in late September.

Since there are also many different varieties of Blueberries that have different harvest times, by growing a few different cultivars, you can have fresh blueberries throughout most of the year.

Here is a complete list of States in alphabetical order below with the general harvest time for Blueberries. Be sure to read on as we also consider a few highlights from some of the States blueberry harvesting and growing season.

StateBlueberry Season
AlabamaMiddle May – Early July
AlaskaLate August – Late September
ArizonaJune – July
ArkansasJune – August
CaliforniaMid May – Late July
ColoradoEarly June – Late July
ConnecticutEarly July – Mid October
DelawareMid June – August
FloridaLate March – Late May
GeorgiaJune – August
HawaiiCan Grow and Flower All Year Round
IdahoMid July – Late August
IllinoisJuly – August
IndianaJune – August
IowaMid June – Mid September
KansasJune – July
KentuckyEarly June – Early August
LouisianaMay – Mid July
MaineLate July – Early September
MarylandLate June – Early August
MassachusettsMid July – Late August
MichiganJuly – Mid August
MinnesotaJuly – Mid August
MississippiMay – August
MissouriEarly June – Early October
MontanaLate July – End of August
NebraskaLate July – End of August
NevadaLate July – End of August
New HampshireJuly – September
New JerseyMid June – Mid August
New MexicoJune – Mid July
New YorkMid June – Early September
North CarolinaLate June – Early August
North DakotaMid July – August
OhioMid June – End of August
OklahomaEarly June – Late July
OregonMid June – Late September
PennsylvaniaLate July – Late September
Rhode IslandEarly July – Mid October
South CarolinaEarly June – Mid August
South DakotaMid July – End of August
TennesseeMid June – Mid August
TexasMay – July
UtahMid July – End of August
VermontMid July – Late August
VirginiaJune – August
WashingtonLate June – September
West VirginiaMid July – End of August
WisconsinEarly July – Mid August
WyomingMid July – Early September

As you can see from the table above, blueberry season generally runs from late March through to late September or early October in the United States. Florida has the earliest crop with Connecticut, Missouri and Rhode Island having the latest crops in October.

We thought it would be helpful to distinguish the best varieties to grow by State, as certain varieties are better suited to certain temperature zones. We list the best varieties in order of preference. For example in Alabama the best variety would be Rabbiteye then Northern Highbush and Southern Highbush. The data is gathered from University, Agriculture and Government websites. Take a look at the references for further varieties and planting information in each State.

StateBest Blueberry Varieties To Grow
AlabamaRabbiteye, Northern Highbush, Southern Highbush [1]
AlaskaHighBush – Northblue, Northsky [2]
ArizonaSouthmoon, Sharpblue, Sunshine Blue [3]
ArkansasNorthern Highbush, Rabbiteye [4]
CaliforniaSouthern Highbush [5]
ColoradoBluegold, Polaris [6]
ConnecticutHighbush – Bluegold, Ivanhoe [7]
DelawareBluecrop, Lenoir, Nelson [8]
FloridaRabbiteye, Southern Highbush [9]
GeorgiaRabbiteye [10]
HawaiiMisty, Sharpblue, Sunshine Blue [11]
IdahoPatriot, Blueray, Nelson [12]
IllinoisCollins, Patriot, Bluejay, Bluecrop [13]
IndianaNorthern Highbush – Bluecrop
IowaPatriot, Blueray, Bluecrop, Rubel [14]
KansasBluecrop, Patriot
KentuckyOzarkblue, Sierra, Nelson, Darrow [15]
LouisianaRabbiteyes – Climax, Tifblue, Brightwell, Premier
MainePatriot, Northland, Blueray [16]
MarylandBluetta, Duke, Earliblue, Spartan, Patriot [17]
MassachusettsBluejay, Duke, Patriot and Spartan [18]
MichiganBluecrop, Jersey, Elliott, Duke, Rubel, Bluejay [19]
MinnesotaChippewa, Northblue, Northland [20]
MississippiRabbiteye – Baldwin, Southern Highbush – O’Neal [21]
MissouriBluejay, Blueray [22]
MontanaNorthland, Patriot [23]
NebraskaBlueray, Bluecrop, Patriot [24]
NevadaBlueray, Patriot, Bluecrop
New HampshireBlueray, Bluecrop, Patriot, Earliblue, Jersey, Meader [25]
New JerseyBluetta, Blueray, Patriot [24]
New MexicoNorthern Highbush, Southern Highbush
New YorkHighbush
North CarolinaClimax, Columbus, Powderblue [26]
North DakotaCanadian haskaps* [27]
OhioHighbush – Bluecrop, Bluejay [28]
OklahomaHighbush, Rabbiteye, Southern Highbush [29]
OregonNorthern Highbush, Half-High, Rabbiteye [30]
PennsylvaniaBluetta, Bluejay, Spartan, Patriot [31]
Rhode IslandEarliblue, Blueray, Lateblue
South CarolinaRabbiteye, Southern highbush, Northern highbush [32]
South DakotaHighbush
TennesseeRabbiteye – Climax, Highbush – Blueray, Bluecrop [33]
TexasRabbiteye – Climax, Powderblue [34]
UtahHalfhigh – Northblue, Highbush – Blueray [35]
VermontNorthern Highbush, Lowbush [36]
VirginiaLowbush, Highbush, Rabbiteye
WashingtonNorthern Highbush, Southern Highbush, Rabbiteye
West VirginiaNorthern Highbush – Spartan, Bluecrop, Jersey [37]
WisconsinHalf High – Northblue, Northsky [38]
WyomingHoneycrisp, Haralson, McIntosh

When selecting a good blueberry bush to plant make sure you get one from a reputable nursery or reputable online store. Try to find a bush at least 1 to 3 years old, with preference on 3 years as they will produce fruit more quickly and take less time to get established. Sometimes you may notice that your blueberry bush leaves have a red or purple colour. You will need to fix this by following the steps in this article: Why Are My Blueberry Leaves Turning Red?

You will also need to make sure you have two different varieties as blueberry bushes require cross pollination and even those varieties that don’t require cross pollination produce better crops if they are cross pollinated. For all the details on how to plant blueberry bushes please check out our article: How To Plant Blueberry Bushes.

We thought it would be helpful to look at a few of the more interesting growing and harvesting blueberry season tips from a few of the States.

Florida Blueberry Season

If you are wanting to grow blueberries in Florida then two types grow well. There is the rabbiteye and southern highbush. Rabbiteye do well in Northern Florida, however, if you are in South Florida then you should plant the Southern highbush.

Florida is the first State to see the blueberry season begin, with the season running for 6 to 8 weeks. In fact, such a lot of fruit trees do well in Florida, you might like to check out our article: Best Fruit Trees To Grow In Florida to get a few more ideas on what fruit trees to plant.

Maine Blueberry Season

Blueberries that are very hardy and that ripen early are best suited to Maine’s short growing season and cold winter temperatures. Always plant more than one variety, such as the Patriot and Bluecrop variety as cross-pollination among different varieties will improve fruit numbers and fruit size. You will also lengthen the harvest season as the two different varieties will ripen at different times.

California Blueberry Season

The bluecrop blueberry variety is a very good producer starting in late May in San Jose. This fruit has a good flavour with medium sized fruit. It is of the Northern Highbush variety so performs well in California.

If you are looking for a blueberry with high chill hours and a crisp texture with excellent flavour, then the Reveille blueberry is sure to please. It is a Southern Highbush variety requiring 500 chill hours for the fruit to set. It is easy to grow in both hot or cool climates and has an early season.

Colorado Blueberry Season

Colorado has high pH soils making it hard to grow blueberries in the ground. However, they do very well grown in pots. The best potting mix to use to get a good pH range of 4.2 to 5.0 pH that blueberries thrive in would be a mix of 40% shredded coconut husk (coir), 40% peat and 20% perlite.

The varieties grown are mostly half-high blueberries. These are bred to have a sweet berry like the highbush and to be hardy like the lowbush varieties.

Connecticut Blueberry Season

In Connecticut it is preferred that blueberry planting is done during late fall, however, a March timing is also acceptable for planting.

Earliblue has a very early season, whereas Bluecrop has a mid season and Elliott has a very late season. Growing three varieties such as these not only improves berry production and fruit setting but will also extend the blueberry season for longer due to the different times the fruits ripen.

North Dakota*

Blueberries are almost impossible to grow in North Dakota due to the alkaline soils and harsh cold winters. You can however grow other fruits, such as the Canadian haskaps, which taste and look like a blueberry.

Haskaps are a Good Blueberry Alternative

Haskaps taste is described as delicious and has been likened to a blueberry with an essence of raspberry. Its texture is similar to that of a blueberry.

Haskaps are harvested in late June or early July. 


References:

[1] Alabama A&M And Auburn Universities: Commercial Blueberry Production Guide for Alabama
[2] United States Department of Agriculture: Blueberry Trials on Alaska’s Kenai Peninsula
[3] Garden Guides: How to Plant Blueberries in Montana
[4] University of Arkansas: Blueberry Production in Arkansas
[5] University of California: Blueberry Varieties
[6] Colorado State University: Blueberries in Pots
[7] New Jersey Agricultural Expermient Station: Selecting Blueberry Varieties for the Home Garden
[8] University of Delaware: Choosing Blueberry Varieties For Delmarva
[9] University of Florida: Blueberries
[10] University of Georgia: Home Garden Blueberries
[11] College of Tropical Agriculture and Human Resources University of Hawaii: Growing Blueberries for Home Production in Hawaii
[12] University of Idaho: Growing Blueberries
[13] University of Illinois: Small Fruit Crops For The Backyard
[14] Iowa State University: Which Blueberry Varieties Perform Well In Iowa
[15] University of Kentucky: Growing Highbush Blueberries In Kentucky
[16] University of Maine: Growing Highbush Blueberries
[17] University of Maryland: Selecting Varieties, Planting, and Growing Blueberries
[18] Massachusetts Cultivated Blueberry Growers Association: Growing Blueberries
[19] Michigan State University: Blueberry Varieties for Michigan
[20] University Of Minnesota: Growing Blueberries In The Home Garden
[21] Mississippi State University: What Varieties of Blueberries Should Be Grown?
[22] Missouri State: Growing Blueberries in Missouri
[23] Montana State University: Berry Production in Montana – Varieties and Markets
[24] New Jersey Agricultural Experiment Station: Selecting Blueberry Varieties for the Home Garden
[25] University of New Hampshire: Which Blueberry Varieties Should I Plant In My Backyard?
[26] North Carolina State University: How Do I Grow Blueberries?
*[27] North Dakota State University: “Blueberries” For North Dakota
[28] Ohio State University Extension: Growing Blueberries in the Home Garden
[29] Oklahoma State University: Blueberry Production for the Home Garden
[30] Oregon State University: Growing Blueberries in Your Home Garden
[31] Pennsylvania State University: Blueberry Variety Selection in the Home Fruit Planting
[32] Clemson Cooperative Extension Home & Garden Information Center: Blueberry
[33] The University of Tennessee: Blueberries in Home Gardens
[34] Texas A&M University: Blueberries
[35] Utah State University: Blueberries in Utah? Difficult, But Maybe Not Impossible
[36] University of Vermont: Basics Of Growing Blueberries
[37] West Viginia University: Growing Blueberries For Beginners
[38] University of Wisconsin: Growing Blueberries In Containers

Juan & Raquel

We are Juan & Raquel, the guys behind Fruit Information. We've been interested in fruit over the last few decades and have been busy with improving our knowledge of the different varieties. I, Juan, have been almost a fruitarian for over a decade and almost solely living on fruits as my main dietary intake. My wife Raquel has worked on a fruit farm and also worked in a nursery and seedlings shop. She is a very experienced and knowledgeable farmer. We have recently undertaken a new Dragon Fruit farm with friends.

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